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Raiders Film Room: What newly signed free agent tackle Trent Brown brings to the table

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Super Bowl LIII - New England Patriots v Los Angeles Rams Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Racing off the starting line of free agency, the Oakland Raiders are reportedly reached a deal with Super Bowl Champion left tackle Trent Brown. The deal won’t be official until Wednesday but Brown is set to make $66 million over 4 years. This contract makes Brown the highest paid offensive lineman in NFL history. Here’s a look at how Brown’s play on the field fits in the Raiders offense.

Pass Protection

Trent Brown is a top end pass protector. He got his start in San Francisco as a 7th round draft pick. He played on the right side in San Francisco but switched to the left in New England. On the rep above, Brown is able to lean on technique to usher Los Angeles Charger Melvin Ingram around the pocket, keeping his quarterback clean.

On most of his reps Brown shows great patience in his pass set and doesn’t guess and turn before making contact with the rusher. When he does shoot his hands however he has great power and rushers have a very hard time getting off the block.

The new Raider pass protector shows the ability to vary his pass sets when you study him on film. The purpose of this strategy is to keep the rusher guessing and disrupt his pass rush plan. Brown has surprising quickness in his footwork for a man listed at 6’8 360lbs. The extra weight only shows up when he leans on rushers who have a hard time staying balanced and powerful when turning the corner against the behemoth blocker.

Brown’s hand placement is another thing that jumps off the tape. He displays a textbook inside hand on the rep above. Brown stays even with Kansas City Chiefs OLB Dee Ford before making contact with that inside hand. Once his hand connects he has the positioning to force Ford around the back of the pocket.

Speaking of that inside hand, Brown shows why the hand placement is so important in this rep against Los Angeles Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa. Brown employs a jump set before hitting Bosa with that inside hand. When Bosa changes directions and attempts to counter inside, Brown has the positioning to stop what might have otherwise been a quick win for a sack. Credit the quarterback for the movement within the pocket of course.

What also stands out on tape is how much larger Brown is than these AFC West pass rushers. Joey Bosa is the biggest, listed at 6’5 280lbs. Brown dwarfs him and the others while staying light enough on his feet to mirror their pass rush moves. His work pass protecting against Raiders divisional opponents no doubt is how he was able to cash in with the Raiders in free agency.

Run Blocking

Shout out to a twitter follower who showed me this rep from Brown during his time with the 49ers. Brown can be a load in the run game and his surprising nimbleness for his frame is a serious problem for defenders against the run.

The play above is an outside zone. Brown is on the right side and explodes into his man allowing the right guard to secure the block before Brown moves up the second level. Gotta love his ability to get downfield and finish.

Again Brown shows his ability to move laterally in the run game. Excuse the typo in the tweet above, the play is going right which means Brown has to execute a reach block on the backside defensive tackle. This is a difficult block and an offensive coordinator must have confidence that his tackle can actually do it before adding this play in the gameplan.

Brown takes a lateral step and is able to position his shoulders in front of the defensive tackle. The most impressive part of this block is how Brown is able to maintain that position while running full speed laterally and does just enough to stop the defender from making a play in pursuit.

Another zone play where Brown shows great lateral movement. The defensive end this time is head up on Brown. The left tackle is able to beat him to the edge and extends his hips to knock the man in front of him onto the ground. At the same time a safety jumps in the run fit and Brown has the wherewithal to unload on him too. Not too often you see a double pancake on a single play.

Conclusion

Brown is a giant tackle with experience playing on both sides as a pro. He leans on his technique and power as a pass blocker and can move well enough to make the most of his frame and natural strength. When he gets his hands on a defender its over. The Raiders made a huge upgrade by signing an ascending player who is still only 25 years old.